Sascha Hein

Sascha Hein

ECPC: 
Expert Consultant
Title: 
Professor of Education

Sascha Hein, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Education and Psychology at the Free University of Berlin, Germany. His research takes a life-course approach to understanding the development of individuals who struggle with precarious circumstances and face social marginalization. Dr. Hein uses multilevel, multimethod approaches to examine the impact of formal (e.g., Western-style schooling) and informal (e.g., family and community apprenticeship) learning on child and adolescent development in countries such as Zambia and Saudi Arabia. Another focus of his work is the mechanisms and biological bases that link parenting and offspring’s long-term psychological adjustment, with an emphasis on epigenetic mechanisms (e.g., DNA methylation). Recently, he focused his work on the development of children and families growing up in crisis-affected, humanitarian, and marginalized contexts, and the impact of parent programs on these hard-to-reach populations. He joined the Free University of Berlin in 2019 after holding positions at the University of Houston, Yale University, and the Goethe University (Germany).

Select bibliography 

1. Hein, S., Bick, J., Issa, G., Aoude, L., Maalouf, C., Awar, A., Nourallah, S., Zonderman, A. L., Householder, S., Katsovich, L., Khoshnood, K., Moore, C., Salah, R., Britto, P. R., Leckman, J. F., & Ponguta, L. A. (2020). Maternal perceptions of father involvement among refugee and disadvantaged families in Beirut, Lebanon. PLOS ONE, 15(3), e0229670. doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0229670 
 
2. Ponguta, L.A., Issa, G., Aoude, L., Maalouf, C., Hein, S., Bick, J., …& Leckman, J.F. (2020). Effects of the Mother-Child Education Program on parenting stress and disciplinary practices among refugee and other marginalized communities in Lebanon: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2019.12.010. [Epub ahead of print]
 
3. Hein, S., & Weeland, J. (2019). Introduction to the special issue: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in clinical and community settings: Challenges, alternative, and supplementary designs. In S. Hein and J. Weeland (Eds.), Alternatives to Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in Studying Child and Adolescent Development in Clinical and Community Settings. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 167, 7-15. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/cad.20312
 
4. Hein, S., Thomas, T., Naumova, O., Luthar, S. S., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2019). Negative parenting modulates the association between mother’s DNA methylation profiles and adult offspring depression. Developmental Psychobiology, 61(2), 304-310. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21789
 
5. Li, N., & Hein, S. (2019). Parenting, autonomy in learning, and development during adolescence in China. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 163, 1-14. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/cad.20290
 
6. Hein, S., Tan, M., Rakhlin, N., Doyle, N., Hart, L., Macomber, D., Ruchkin, V., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2017). Psychological and sociocultural adaptation of children adopted from Russia and their associations with pre-adoption risk factors and parenting. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(10), 2669-2680. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-017-0782-9
 
7. Hein, S., Reich, J., Marks, S., Thuma, P. E., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2016). Getting something out of nothing: Analyzing patterns of null responses to improve data collection methods in sub-Saharan Africa. Learning and Individual Differences, 46, 11-16. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2014.11.024
 
8. Hein, S., Tan, M., Reich, J., Thuma, P. E., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2016). School effects on non-verbal intelligence and nutritional status in rural Zambia. Learning and Individual Differences, 46, 25-37. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2015.04.004

See Dr Hein’s complete bibliograpy on Research Gate.

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